No One is Too Small to Attack

If you’ve been a security practitioner for any length of time, you have probably hear this from a client at least once:

We’re too small/unimportant to be a target of hackers.

If you’ve been doing this for any length of time you also know this is the point in the conversation where you smile politely, get up, and excuse yourself while they go back to their business and you go on to your next meeting. Anyone who has it in their head that they don’t have a red laser dot on their forehead is not going to be convinced by your war stories or ream of counter-examples.

They will learn the hard way.

The thing you want to tell these folks is that anyone online is a target because everyone online has something of value. The reason most folks who think they’re not targets think the way they do is because they don’t deal in valuable information. Data breaches at banks, government agencies, or credit bureaus make headlines because your name, along with your birth date, social security number, bank account, and so on are monetizable.

If you move or make commodity widgets, your efficiency and up-time are what you consider valuable. The design of the widget is not special; they’re one of a hundred factories worldwide that make widgets. What these folks don’t realize is that just having a computer online is a valuable resource to someone. That’s one more processor that a bad guy didn’t have before. It’s one more hard drive they can store illicit material on. One more system they can hop through or use to target another victim. You may not be a target, but you could be an accessory.

It’s also important to note that while you may not be the intended victim of someone else’s attack, that you were involved means down-time, and the expense of cleaning systems, and most all the other issues that the actual victim has to deal with. Yes, on a smaller scale, but it’s not zero, which is the sum you came up with when you decided you weren’t a target.

The widget makers of the world are right to look with a jaundiced eye at calls to spend a lot on security, or to procure a lot of fancy boxes and software. When solutions are designed by people who cut their teeth on fighting nation-state adversaries and “advanced” threats, there isn’t a lot of options for people who need the basics.

Success in cybersecurity at every level means paying attention to business needs, and acceptable risks, not just external threats. The best advice is holistic in nature, not a pitch that plays to your professional strengths. That you know how to wield a hammer is not an excuse for only paying attention to exposed nails.

Most of the time, the best security recommendations are the cheap and unglamorous ones. No, it’s not pretty or fun, but it’s what you owe your clients if you’re really about security.

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