Cyber Security Through the Lens of an Election

Inauguration day has come and gone, giving us some time to reflect on both the previous election process as well as what lies ahead for the next four years. There are a number of parallels between running for office and running a cyber security operation, and a few lessons learned from the former can help those involved in the latter.

It’s a Campaign, Not a Day Hike

Depending on the office you’re running for, your campaign might start years before the winner takes the oath of office. Likewise, it is likely to take years to reach the ideal end-state for the IT enterprise you’re responsible to protect. To further complicate things, technology in general and security threats specifically will change over time, which means the probability you’ll see the end of the race is very close to 0. Not running is not an option, so pace yourself.

You Need a Team

Every chief executive needs a team to get things done. In government, it’s called a “cabinet” and in business the “C-suite.” Regardless of the nomenclature, the purpose is the same: they are the people who specialize in certain things who help you formulate and execute policy. If you’re lucky you’ll get a team that buys into your vision, trusts you implicitly, and has the resources necessary to get the job done. More than likely you’re going to have something more akin to a Team of Rivals, but not ones you got to pick.

 (All Kinds of) Experience Matters

There is no one-size fits-all career path that leads to the White House. People that get into cyber security have a wide range of backgrounds. Yet in both fields people love to poke at perceived shortcomings of those who aspire to (or end up in) top positions. We pick on Michael Daniel or Rudy Giuliani for their lack of technical acumen, forgetting that George Washington never went to high school and his first job was blue collar. Being able to cast a vision, manage people under stress, mange limited resources, and inspire confidence; none of those things requires a given type or level of education, and all of them can be developed in a variety of ways.

Everyone is a Constituent

If you’re in security, everyone is “your people.” You don’t have a party, you don’t have a faction, you have to make everyone happy. At the very least you have to keep everyone from revolting. Everyone has a different agenda, different needs, different outlooks. You will make enemies, and different people will be your friend or foe depending on the situation. Success depends on keeping all those factors in balance so that you can move the center forward.

It’s a great parlor game to try and figure out what the next four years is going to be like on the political front, but the fact of the matter is we have no real idea how things are going to go. In that sense politics is a lot like cyber security: you prepare for the worst, you assume every day is going to be rocky, but sometimes you get pleasantly surprised.

Hail to the Chief! All of them.

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