Better Design, Better Security Participation?

A new study by NIST found that a majority of typical computer users experience “security fatigue” that often leads to risky computing behavior at work and in their personal lives. Security fatigue is defined in the study as a weariness or reluctance to deal with computer security. “The finding that the general public is suffering from security fatigue is important because it has implications in the workplace and in people’s everyday life,” said Brian Stanton, a cognitive psychologist and co-author of the report . “It is critical because so many people bank online, and since health care and other valuable information is being moved to the Internet.” (Biometric Update)

Security products are developed by security nerds, for security nerds, which are an increasingly rare breed. Think about how you get a new app for your phone: search, click link to install, start using app. Now think about all the flaming hoops you had to jump through the last time you had a security problem, or tried to install some security mechanism. The less users have to think about making sound security decisions, and the easier it is for them to take action, the less likely they are to become victims. Hard core security wonks will laugh at the idea of cybersecurity UX, but there is a reason why the more elegant and efficient a tool the more passionate its users. 

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